Half Marathon Training Plan for Beginners

Half Marathon Training Plan for Beginners

So you've done a 5k and a 10k and are looking to step it up to a Half Marathon.  Here is a simple, yet effective, training plans for a half marathon race.  This program is for individuals capable of running 8-10 miles per week.  If this schedule is too easy, it might be time to get working on a full marathon plan.  Always remember to listen to your body and take it easy when you are sore.  Extra rest is always a good thing when training for a race.

 

 

 

Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 Rest 2 mi Rest 2.5 mi Rest 3 mi 20-30 min easy run or cross-train
2 Rest 2 miles Rest 3 mi Cross Train or Rest 4 mi 20-30 min easy run or cross-train
3 Rest 2.5 mi Cross Train 3 mi Rest 5 mi 20-30 min easy run or cross-train
4 Rest 3 mi Cross Train 4 mi Rest 6 mi 20-30 min easy run or cross-train
5 Rest 3 mi Cross Train 3 mi Rest 7 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
6 Rest 4 mi Cross Train 4 mi Rest 8 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
7 Rest 4 mi Rest 4 mi Cross Train 9 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
8 Rest 4 mi Cross Train 3 mi Rest 10 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
9 Rest 5 mi Cross Train 4 mi Rest 11 mi Rest
10 30 min easy run or cross-train 4 mi Rest 3 mi Cross Train 12 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
11 Rest Cross Train Rest 3 mi Cross Train 5 mi 30 min easy run or cross-train
12 Rest 2 mi 20 minutes Rest 20 minutes Race Day!  

 

Mondays: Rest is critical to healthy recovery and to prevent training injuries so make sure to take rest days.  More is not better when training for a race.

Tuesdays and Thursdays: Make sure to have a good warm up followed by the above exercise, then a cool down and after training stretch.

Wednesdays: Cross-train or rest.  Cross-training, biking, swimming, elliptical trainer, or other cardio activity, is a great way to continue training and to exercise different muscles in your body. If you are having an extra sore week, blow off the cross-training and take an extra rest day.

Fridays: Cross-training, biking, swimming, elliptical trainer, or other cardio activity, is a great way to continue training and to exercise different muscles in your body. If you are having an extra sore week, blow off the cross-training and take an extra rest day.

Saturdays: This is your long run day. After you warm up, run at a comfortable, conversational pace.

Sundays: This is an active recovery day. This means take your choice of an easy, comfortable run, a run/ walk combination, or a cross-training session.

Remember to check with your physician before starting any major exercise program. Sourced from Running.com.

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Posted Thursday, March 21, 2013 by Michael Gonzales in Training Plans, Running